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 moldboard plow
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Mike Dahms

USA
51 Posts

Posted - 01/20/2013 :  13:07:31  Show Profile  Visit Mike Dahms's Homepage Send Mike Dahms a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Recently acquired an AC moldboard plow serial no 09701219 with the square style sleeve hitch and have many questions. The plow share is fairly well pitted. What is the best way to clean that up. I'm told the pits will interfere with operation. The sleeve hitch is slightly wider than my tractor hitch. Can I just spread the outside bars to accommodate the sleeve hitch. Can't yet find wheel weights. How much do you think I need or can I just fill the tires. I plan to pull this with my 16HP B112 and be ready for Kentucky plow day. Any thoughts on this are greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Mike Dahms

skunkhome

USA
12746 Posts

Posted - 01/20/2013 :  18:23:42  Show Profile Send skunkhome a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The older FDT's had a slightly narrower drawbar. The RBT's late tractors had an offset on the right side allowing the single point hitch to attach. I installed an offset link off a running board tractor onto my b112 but I suppose you could space it out with thick washers about 3/8 of an inch. That would require longer attachment bolts for attachment to the transmission and main hitch assembly. As for the pitting on the share, try cleaning it up with a brick and then run it in the ground for final polishing. After use I like to cover mine with a film of boiled linseed oil which dries to a protective coating which will strip off quickly when the plow is put back into use. I would stay away from paints that are too tough to strip off readily under use.

Phil



"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither safety nor liberty."

Benjamin Franklin
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cschmidt62

USA
560 Posts

Posted - 01/24/2013 :  20:27:53  Show Profile  Visit cschmidt62's Homepage Send cschmidt62 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
If the moldboard is really pitted I would uses various grades of sandpaper or a wire brush to clean it up best you can. I would start with a fairly aggressive paper and end with a fine to get most of it out. Nothing will clean it (scour it) like use. If you use it enough you can get the shine back pretty good. Years ago my dad and grandpa used to use an old red brick to clean them up. After cleaning I would use grease or a light coat of soft paint to protect it from re-rusting. I myself like to use grease but it can be a little messy.

Artificial Intelligence is no match for Natural Stupidity
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olcowhand

USA
5110 Posts

Posted - 01/24/2013 :  21:32:16  Show Profile  Visit olcowhand's Homepage Send olcowhand a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I had one that was pretty darned rough. So I actually used an angle grinder on it, but just using it lightly so as not to cut in deep. Then I switched to 80 grit on a rotary sander, NOT the orbital type. That left it fairly smooth, and a good day of plowing put it in very nice shape. You can't get all the pits out if they are deep, but you can dress it down to where it will plow fine.

Daniel in Ky -- So much to do, so little time!




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Denny

348 Posts

Posted - 01/25/2013 :  08:06:03  Show Profile  Visit Denny's Homepage Send Denny a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Back when I was a kid,, and plowing on the farm,, we used to shake up a bottle of Coke and spray the plows down,when we were done,,, it would stay on like grease till next season,, and would actually eat any rust,,,, but them was the old days,,, probably changed the Coke,,, now days ,, it'll probably eat the plow.

Early B10
67 Bee10
68 B16HD 112 Loader
68 B112 L112
68 B112
4041 Power Max
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Mike Dahms

USA
51 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2013 :  20:51:27  Show Profile  Visit Mike Dahms's Homepage Send Mike Dahms a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have my plow fairly well cleaned up. It's my understanding that I will need to weld a tab on the bottom side of the tube in the lift assembly to accept the lift rod from the hitch. My question is where do I put the tab.. Is there some set of dimensions so that I get the proper length. Thanks again for the help.

Mike Dahms
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Jed2155

USA
60 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2013 :  21:07:15  Show Profile  Visit Jed2155's Homepage Send Jed2155 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
We used burnt motor oil to coat the plows and discs. I know its not the most PC thing to do but works like a charm. 50 yr old plow shines like new money after 1 furrow or so every year

JED
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Cvans

USA
4159 Posts

Posted - 02/05/2013 :  00:20:40  Show Profile Send Cvans a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Every fall it was grab some tubes of grease and coat the plows. I was told by some old timers to find a sand or gravel pit and pull the plow through that to scour the bottoms. Makes sense but I can't recommend it as I don't know if it works.


East Central South Dakota

The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not.
Thomas Jefferson


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skunkhome

USA
12746 Posts

Posted - 02/05/2013 :  09:03:08  Show Profile Send skunkhome a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mike Dahms

I have my plow fairly well cleaned up. It's my understanding that I will need to weld a tab on the bottom side of the tube in the lift assembly to accept the lift rod from the hitch. My question is where do I put the tab.. Is there some set of dimensions so that I get the proper length. Thanks again for the help.

The hole in the tab needs to be 3.5" from the c/l of the pivot and 1.5" below the c/l of the tube. Before you go welding up your lift you might consider using the chain list. I prefer to run mine off a chain lift so the plow will be stationary and straight when lifted but free to swing when in the ground. Plow needs to be allowed to pivot at least a little to keep the plow from steering the tractor rather than vise versa.


Phil



"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither safety nor liberty."

Benjamin Franklin

Edited by - skunkhome on 02/05/2013 14:14:33
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